My article on silver
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Joined: June 12, 2003
Posts: 59
Submissions: 16
Location: Romania

My article on silver
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Posted on Wed May 19, 2004 10:25 am
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Finally, I found some time to write it. Due to it being written in a hurry, it had some mistakes. Thanks for correcting them. I also posted a modified one with the corrected issues included, for purposes of decreasing confusion.
I am a chemistry student and I think I could help you out if you had any questions regarding chemistry. Just reply to this thread or email me. I will post answers a.s.a.p.
Short presentation of gold and platinic metals coming soon, but it's going to be mostly theoretical, cause I don't have a digital camera or precious metal wire....


We grow as the tree grows, putting out new leaves in spring. And through it all, the soul remains hidden, adding ring upon ring upon ring...

Joined: July 03, 2003
Posts: 941
Submissions: 17
Location: Charles City, Iowa

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Posted on Thu May 20, 2004 5:20 am
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I have two comments on your article.

#1 I have to disagree with your "Choosing the right material" comments. I prefer and recommend using .925 full hard or spring hard sterling for jewelry over sacrificing metal quality/purity by using .850 - .900 silver. I realize that this is only 2.5% - 7.5% difference but in the U.S. it means the difference between being able to say your product is made of "sterling silver" or just calling it "silver jewelry". Sometimes "percieved quality" is more important to customers and sterling means quality silver to American buyers.

I have worn my full hard sterling byz necklace 24/7 from the day it was made with no repairs needed and my E4-1 ring 24/7 for 8 months with only 1 repair when I snagged it on something. Both are made of butted .032 full hard .925 sterling silver.

#2 In your "Wire" section you stated

"Coins range in grade from 600 (poor quality, nasty looking, keep away from them) to 800 (common grade, quite nice) and even as high as 900, or even higher."

All pre-1965 American silver coins and pre-1969 Canadian silver coins are .900 silver and current issue "collector coins" are .999 silver.

I realize that this is an international board but the majority of our membership at this time is American and Canadian so these "little differences" seem bigger.

Joined: June 12, 2003
Posts: 59
Submissions: 16
Location: Romania

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Posted on Thu May 20, 2004 10:31 am
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First about the coins: I am familiar with European coins, and particularly tose minted in the 1900's, because they usually don't have any historical value, and are suitable only for melting (that makes them real cheap, too). And most of the coins in Central and Eastrn Europe are between 800 and 900 purity. Pure collectors' silver coins are much too valuable to collectors to be melted.
I recomended those purities for making your own wire, if you don't buy it and you are not able to choose sterling silver for purity. And I think that in the US you can buy silver wire... The article was intended for people in other countries (mostly), and there are places in the world (like Romania) where nobody sells sterling silver wire.


We grow as the tree grows, putting out new leaves in spring. And through it all, the soul remains hidden, adding ring upon ring upon ring...

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