Where 2 buy titanium/stainless steel 20 gauge spool?
View previous topic | View next topic >
Post new topic Reply to topic
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Wire Arts
   
Author Message

Joined: July 20, 2010
Posts: 3
Submissions: 0
Location: Nitza M. Alexander

Where 2 buy titanium/stainless steel 20 gauge spool?
Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 3:56 am
Link to Post: Link to Post

Hi
I am new here and I need a help.
I made fairy wings and as per the new CSPIA law I need to made them in titanium, stainless steel/corrosion-resistant steel if they are made for children under 12 years. I made the adult ones in galvanized aluminum gauge 16. I understand as per all information I read that I probably need titanium or stainless steel in a 20 gauge because I need to bend them with my hands.
I will appreciate all information you can bring me.

Sincerely,

Nitza Alexander

Joined: May 15, 2010
Posts: 120
Submissions: 3

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 3:33 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Why were you using galvanized aluminum? Aluminum doesn't rust anyway. Just wondering Smile



Joined: December 22, 2007
Posts: 4185
Submissions: 106
Location: Hampton, Virginia USA

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:08 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

Have you checked out The Ring Lord?


"I am a leaf on the wind." ~ Wash
Lorraine's Chains
Gallery Submission Guidelines

Joined: July 20, 2010
Posts: 3
Submissions: 0
Location: Nitza M. Alexander

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 5:02 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I know that aluminum rarely rust but read this:

Titanium (both a- and b-phase) uses
elements such as aluminum, gallium,
oxygen, nitrogen, molybdenum,
vanadium, tungsten, tantalum, and
silicon as alloying materials. Lead is
considered an undesired impurity and
is not found in titanium alloys. In all of
the titanium alloys examined, we did
not find an instance where lead was a
constituent. Consequently, the
Commission has revised proposed
§ 1500.91(d)(2) (now renumbered as
§ 1500.91(e)(2)) to add ‘‘titanium’’ to the
list of determinations on precious
metals.
As for other metals and alloys,
including aluminum, copper and
pewter, such metals and alloys may
contain significant amounts of lead, and
we cannot verify that the specific
products containing such metals or
alloys comply with the lead content
limits without testing. Accordingly, these other
metals and alloys continue to be subject
to the testing and certification
requirements of section 102 of the
CPSIA.

The testing is very expensive and that is why I need the materials they choose as accepted.

Joined: March 27, 2009
Posts: 1014
Submissions: 4
Location: Southeastern Minnesota

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 6:22 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

That didn't answer the question. Drahcus was wondering why aluminum would be galvanized, not whether it had lead content.

I will agree with lorraine that TRL is a good choice. You should check them and see if they have what you need. Stainless will be significantly cheaper than titanium, if you have the choice of both.

Joined: May 07, 2008
Posts: 3613
Submissions: 150
Location: Germany, Herxheim

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 6:37 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

I guess, it's simply a matter of confusing galvanizing and anodizing - both processes use electricity during the treatment process, and who doesn't know much about, CAN easily confuse them...

About the lead: Usually ALL base metals that are produced to a more or less part by recycling old stuff, contain a measurable amount of lead - that's just unavoidable. Whether these (usually small) amounts are significant, is another question - bean counters will find lead everywhere, be it significant or not. The simple ability to find contamination traces now, that were not detectable with older analytic methods before, does not mean that they didn't exist then. Nowadays you can find also DDT and Dioxin in all foodstuffs, or Plutonium, or, or, or... So many contamination 'alarms' are, while they should never be neglected, simply a result of over-sensitive methods far from being realistic.

-ZiLi-


Maille Code V2.0 T7.1 R5.6 Ep Fper Mfe.s Ws$ Cpbsw$ G0.3-6.4 I1.0-30.0 N28.25 Pj Dacdejst Xagtw S08 Hi

Human societies are like chain mail.
A single link will be worth nothing.
A chain is of use, but will break at the weakest link.
A weak weave will have the need to replace weak links.
A strong weave will survive even with weak links included.
-'me

Joined: July 20, 2010
Posts: 3
Submissions: 0
Location: Nitza M. Alexander

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:23 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

What happen is that I am Not able to use any wire that contents lead and as per their review with the galvanized wire it contains large amounts of lead. Here is the CSPIA info.

8. Other Metals Including Titanium,
Aluminum, Pewter, Copper
Some commenters requested that
certain other metals, including stainless
steel, titanium, aluminum, pewter and
copper be added to the list of
determinations.
We agree, in part, with the
commenters that stainless steel (with
the exception of one stainless steel
alloy) and titanium should be added to
the list of determinations. [Ref. 6].
Stainless steel is a generic name for
corrosion-resistant steel alloys.
Typically, the manufacturing process for
stainless steel uses recycled scrap as
well as ‘‘virgin’’ (newly refined) steel,
yet the manufacturing process heats the
steel to temperatures high enough to
vaporize any lead and lead oxide
present. Once the steel melts, the mix is
subjected to a vacuum, and the lead/
lead oxide gases are drawn off for
condensation and recycling.
Consequently, the manufacture of
stainless steels results in alloys with
lead concentrations less than 100 ppm.
However, we found that one stainless
steel alloy, designated as 303Pb, does
contain lead. The concentration of lead
in 303Pb stainless steel is between
0.12% and 0.30% (1200 to 3000 ppm).
The Unified Numbering System
designation for 303Pb steel is S30360.
Thus, 303Pb stainless steel is excluded
from any determination for stainless
steel. The Commission has revised
proposed § 1500.91(d)(1) (now
renumbered as § 1500.91(e)(1)) to add
‘‘other stainless steel within the
designations of Unified Numbering
System, UNS S13800–S66286, not
including the stainless steel designated
as 303Pb (UNS S30360).’’
Titanium (both a- and b-phase) uses
elements such as aluminum, gallium,
oxygen, nitrogen, molybdenum,
vanadium, tungsten, tantalum, and
silicon as alloying materials. Lead is
considered an undesired impurity and
is not found in titanium alloys. In all of
the titanium alloys examined, we did
not find an instance where lead was a
constituent. Consequently, the
Commission has revised proposed
§ 1500.91(d)(2) (now renumbered as
§ 1500.91(e)(2)) to add ‘‘titanium’’ to the
list of determinations on precious
metals.
As for other metals and alloys,
including aluminum, copper and
pewter, such metals and alloys may
contain significant amounts of lead, and
we cannot verify that the specific
products containing such metals or
alloys comply with the lead content
limits without testing. (See e.g.,
American Society for Metals: Metals
Handbook, Properties and Selection:
Nonferrous Alloys and Pure Metals, 9th
ed., v.2 (1979).) Accordingly, these other
metals and alloys continue to be subject
to the testing and certification
requirements of section 102 of the
CPSIA.

Any suggestions?

Joined: August 30, 2008
Posts: 2842
Submissions: 20
Location: Cambridge, ON, Canada

Reply with quote
Posted on Wed Jul 21, 2010 8:38 pm
Link to Post: Link to Post

nmmontano wrote:
Any suggestions?


Purchase Aluminium Wire from somewhere that is capable of supplying you with the MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheet) for their wire. (Any I have ever purchased from Home Depot/Welding Supply Houses comes with an MSDS shrink wrapped to the spool.)
The MSDS will contain a list of ALL compounds found in the wire, and should be more than enough to satisfy your 'due dilligence' in regards to this (overbearing, but sadly nessecary) government statute.

If an MSDS is not considered sufficient (check with your local government regulator)... You're pretty much stuck with Stainless Steel and Titanium as your alloys of choice...

An MSDS should be considered acceptable, as for every other application on the planet it is... <rant>However, it is my understanding that this law was rushed into the books, by an administration spearheaded by a moron...</rant>

http://www.theringlord.com offers both, in large quantities.
Their stainless is not the 'evil' 303Pb alloy.
Jon should be able to supply an MSDS for any of the wire he sells, though it may add time onto your order, as he may have to request one from the supplier.


Useful Links
Site Help: [ BBCode Help | Weave AR/Ring Size Popup | Login Issues ]
Weave AR Search is back: Try it out!

Post new topic Reply to topic
Jump to:  
Page 1 of 1
All times are GMT. The time now is Fri Nov 21, 2014 4:09 pm
M.A.I.L. Forum Index -> Wire Arts
Display posts from previous: